How to Stop Toilet Water From Splashing: Effective Tips

How to Stop Toilet Water From Splashing?

Toilet water splashing can be stopped by placing a piece of toilet paper over the water’s surface.

This prevents the vertical stream of water or Worthington jet from hitting you by slowing down the falling poop.

As a result, the poop pierces the water at an angle, eliminating the splash problem.

This solution is backed by the findings of Destin Sandlin of Smarter Every Day, who used a high-speed camera and clay to study the phenomenon of poop splash.

Key Points:

  • Place a piece of toilet paper over the water’s surface to prevent toilet water from splashing.
  • Slowing down the falling poop by using toilet paper reduces the impact of the vertical stream of water and eliminates the splash problem.
  • By piercing the water at an angle, the poop does not cause the water to splash.
  • Destin Sandlin of Smarter Every Day used a high-speed camera and clay to study the phenomenon of poop splash and found that using toilet paper is an effective solution.

Did You Know?

1. A little-known fact about toilet water splashing is that it is scientifically referred to as the “toilet plunge effect.”

2. Did you know that the amount of water in a toilet bowl can play a role in reducing splashing? A lower water level will result in more splashing, so it’s good to keep the bowl filled adequately.

3. While it may seem counterintuitive, placing a few squares of toilet paper on the surface of the water can actually help reduce splashing. This helps break the fall of any incoming waste and decreases the chance of splashing occurring.

4. The design of a toilet bowl can affect the amount of water splashing. Toilets with a wider and deeper bowl tend to produce less splashing compared to those with narrower and shallower designs.

5. In Japan, where innovation is prominent, some toilets are equipped with bidet-like features that can help prevent splashing. These features focus on controlling the direction and pressure of the water flow, creating a more gentle flush and minimizing splashing.

Introduction To Toilet Water Splash

Toilet water splash is an unpleasant phenomenon that many of us have experienced while using the toilet. It occurs when an object, such as poop, is dropped forcefully into the water, causing a sudden and unwelcome splash. This article aims to delve into the science behind this phenomenon and provide an effective solution to prevent toilet water from splashing.

The main factors contributing to toilet water splash are:

  • The velocity at which the object enters the water
  • The size and shape of the object
  • The depth of the water in the bowl
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Understanding the science behind toilet water splash can help us find ways to minimize its occurrence. By considering the following tips, you can reduce the likelihood of splashback:

1. Gentle Placement: Instead of dropping objects forcefully into the toilet, try placing them gently to minimize splashing.
2. Flush Before: Flushing the toilet before use will provide a layer of water that can help cushion the impact and reduce splashback.
3. Toilet Paper Liner: Placing a layer of toilet paper on the water’s surface can act as a barrier, preventing splashes.
4. Aim for Sides: Aiming for the sides of the toilet bowl rather than the center can also help prevent splashback.

By implementing these simple strategies, you can decrease the occurrence of toilet water splash and make your visits to the toilet more pleasant.

Understanding The Worthington Jet

The scientific explanation behind toilet water splash is the Worthington jet. This term refers to a vertical stream of water that shoots upward when an object is dropped into the water with force. The jet is formed due to the rapid filling of an air cavity created by the object.

When an object, such as poop, enters the water, it displaces a certain volume of water and creates an air cavity. The surrounding water quickly rushes in to fill this cavity from all sides, resulting in the upward jet of water. This process is similar to what happens when you drop a rock into a pool, causing water to shoot up from the impact point.

High-Speed Camera Tests With Clay

In the video by Destin Sandlin of Smarter Every Day, the phenomenon of toilet water splash is explored using a high-speed camera. This analysis assists in understanding the process of splash creation.

To investigate this phenomenon, Sandlin drops clay objects of different sizes into the water. By capturing the action in slow-motion, he determines that smaller air cavities lead to shorter jets of water, whereas larger air cavities result in more noticeable and pronounced splashes.

Key findings from the video:

  • Smaller air cavities produce shorter jets of water.
  • Larger air cavities generate more pronounced splashes.

This research sheds light on the mechanics of toilet water splash and provides a fascinating insight into this commonly experienced phenomenon.

Preventing Splash With Toilet Paper

Fortunately, there is a simple hack to prevent toilet water from splashing – the humble toilet paper. Sandlin’s experiments reveal that placing a piece of toilet paper over the water’s surface can effectively prevent the jet formed by the poop from hitting you.

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The toilet paper acts as a barrier and slows down the falling poop, causing it to pierce the water at an angle rather than directly. This change in trajectory eliminates the splash problem, as the water does not shoot upward forcefully.

Slowing Down The Falling Poop

To better understand the effectiveness of using toilet paper, Sandlin delves into the idea of slowing down the descent of poop. By adjusting the speed at which the object enters the water, he shows how a slower motion can significantly decrease the chances of a splash.

When the poop enters the water at a slower speed, it generates a smaller air cavity as it displaces the water with less force. As a result, the surrounding water does not rush in as vigorously, which in turn reduces the upward flow and minimizes the risk of a splash.

Effective Solution: Using Toilet Paper To Eliminate Splash

According to Sandlin’s findings, the effective solution to stopping toilet water from splashing is to place a piece of toilet paper over the water’s surface before using the toilet. This simple step acts as a buffer, slowing down the falling poop and altering its trajectory, thereby eliminating the splash problem.

By piercing the water at an angle instead of directly, the potential for a forceful upward jet is significantly reduced. So next time you find yourself worried about toilet water splash, remember this handy trick and spare yourself the unpleasant surprise.


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Frequently Asked Questions

Is it OK if toilet water splashes on you?

No, it is not okay if toilet water splashes on you. It poses a health risk as toilet water can contain harmful bacteria and germs such as E. coli, streptococcus, and salmonella. Exposure to these pathogens can lead to various illnesses and infections. It is important to maintain proper hygiene and take necessary precautions to avoid any contact with toilet water.

What are some effective methods to prevent toilet water from splashing?

There are several effective methods to prevent toilet water from splashing. First, the placement of toilet paper or a floating object in the bowl can act as a barrier, reducing splashing. This can be done by either crumpling up a few sheets of toilet paper and placing them in the water or by using a toilet tank insert that creates a layer on the surface of the water. Second, adjusting the strength of the flush can also help prevent splashing. Most modern toilets have a dual flush mechanism or a button to control the water flow. Using the lower flow option or pressing the button partially can minimize splashing. Additionally, some toilets have modified rim designs or rimless bowls that create a more directed flush, reducing splashing.

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Are there any specific toilet designs or accessories that can help reduce water splashing?

Yes, there are several toilet designs and accessories that can help reduce water splashing. One example is the use of elongated toilet bowls, which are more oval-shaped and have a larger surface area. This design helps to keep the water inside the bowl and minimize splashing. Additionally, some toilets come with features such as a concealed trapway or a special flush system that creates a powerful yet controlled water flow, reducing the chances of splashing.

In terms of accessories, there are toilet seat covers or lids with built-in bidets or sprayers. These accessories allow for a more targeted and controlled water flow, reducing the likelihood of water splashing beyond the intended area. Other accessories such as toilet tank inserts or flush valves with adjustable water flow can also help in minimizing splashing by allowing users to regulate the force of the flush. Overall, there are various toilet designs and accessories available that can help reduce water splashing and provide a more comfortable and hygienic experience.

How does water pressure affect toilet water splashing, and how can it be adjusted to minimize splashing?

Water pressure can have a significant impact on toilet water splashing. Higher water pressure can result in more forceful flushing, which can cause more water to splash out of the toilet bowl. Conversely, lower water pressure may lead to insufficient flushing and increased chances of clogs.

To minimize splashing, the water pressure can be adjusted. For toilets with adjustable fill valves, the water pressure can be reduced by turning the adjustment screw on the valve. This will decrease the flow rate of water into the tank and subsequently reduce the force of flushing, minimizing splashing. However, it is important to strike a balance so that the reduced water pressure still provides enough force for efficient flushing and waste removal. Consulting a plumber or referring to the manufacturer’s instructions can help ensure the optimal water pressure is achieved to minimize splashing.

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