What Is a House Spider? Learn About Their Behavior and Control

What Is a House Spider?

A house spider refers to any of the 11 different species commonly found around human dwellings.

This term is a generic one used to describe spiders that belong to the Tegenaria species.

House spiders can grow up to 120mm in size, with the adult male of the largest species having a leg span of 120mm.

They are most commonly seen in the autumn when the males are searching for females.

House spiders often enter homes through open windows, chimneys, or gaps beneath doors.

They build sheet-like webs in garages, sheds, loft spaces, and cavity walls.

Most Tegenaria species were introduced into the UK from the Mediterranean Region, and they can adapt to buildings, expanding their range in northern England and Scotland.

Key Points:

  • House spiders are a group of 11 different species commonly found around human dwellings.
  • They belong to the Tegenaria species.
  • House spiders can grow up to 120mm in size, with the largest species having a leg span of 120mm.
  • They are most commonly seen in the autumn when males search for females.
  • House spiders enter homes through windows, chimneys, or gaps beneath doors.
  • They build sheet-like webs in garages, sheds, loft spaces, and cavity walls.

Did You Know?

1. House spiders are not true insects, but rather arachnids. Like other spiders, they have eight legs and fangs for feeding on prey.

2. Despite their relatively small size, house spiders are capable of producing multiple types of silk. They use these silks to weave intricate webs for capturing prey and creating egg sacs.

3. House spiders have an incredible ability to adapt to different environments. They are often found in homes, sheds, garages, and even caves, as they can adjust their web-building techniques according to their surroundings.

4. While some house spiders are solitary creatures, others exhibit social behaviors. Certain species, such as the common house spider, create communal webs where multiple spiders live together and cooperate in catching prey.

5. House spiders play a vital ecological role by helping control populations of other insects, including flies, mosquitoes, and other pests commonly found in households. So next time you spot a house spider, remember that it is contributing to a natural pest control system!

House Spider Belongs To Tegenaria Species

House spiders, scientifically known as Tegenaria species, are a common sight in many households. Belonging to the family Agelenidae, they have distinctive characteristics that set them apart from other spider species. With over 500 different species worldwide, Tegenaria spiders are recognized for their diverse shapes, sizes, and behaviors. However, when people refer to “house spiders,” they are generally talking about one of the 11 common species found around human dwellings.

  • House spiders, scientifically referred to as Tegenaria species, are frequently found in households.
  • Tegenaria spiders belong to the family Agelenidae and possess unique characteristics distinguishing them from other spider species.
  • There are over 500 different species of Tegenaria spiders, exhibiting a wide range of shapes, sizes, and behaviors.
  • When people mention “house spiders,” they usually mean one of the 11 common species commonly encountered in human dwellings.

“House spiders are a common sight in households, with Tegenaria species being one of the 11 commonly found around human dwellings.”

Size Of House Spiders Can Reach 120Mm

House spiders, specifically those within the Tegenaria genus, can reach an impressive size compared to their smaller relatives. On average, they can grow up to 120mm in size, including their leg span. This significant measurement contributes to their intimidating appearance and often evokes fear in those who encounter them. The largest species within the Tegenaria genus, Tegenaria parietina, can also reach the same impressive leg span of 120mm. These measurements highlight the potential impact and visibility of these spiders within a household.

  • House spiders can grow up to 120mm in size, including their leg span.
  • Tegenaria parietina is the largest species within the Tegenaria genus.
  • These spiders can be intimidating and often evoke fear in people.
  • Their size contributes to their significant impact and visibility within a household.
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House Spiders Most Commonly Seen In Autumn When Males Search For Females

Autumn is the season when house spiders become most commonly observed by homeowners. During this time, males actively search for females to mate with. The quest for a suitable partner leads them to leave their usual hiding spots and venture into more visible areas of the house. This annual spider activity can create a sense of unease for those who are not fond of spiders, as these creatures seem to appear in unexpected places, triggering feelings of discomfort for some individuals.

  • Autumn is the season when house spiders are commonly observed.
  • Males actively search for females to mate with during this time.
  • They leave their usual hiding spots and venture into more visible areas of the house.
  • This spider activity can create unease for individuals who dislike spiders.

“This annual spider activity can create a sense of unease for those who are not fond of spiders, as these creatures seem to appear in unexpected places, triggering feelings of discomfort for some individuals.”

House Spiders Enter Homes Through Various Means

House spiders have numerous ways of entering homes. They exploit potential entry points such as open windows, chimneys, or gaps beneath doors. Their flexible bodies enable them to easily squeeze through even the tiniest spaces, making it difficult to prevent their access. Additionally, house spiders can be unknowingly introduced into human living spaces when items are brought indoors from outside, leading to the unintentional transportation of their eggs or young spiders.

  • Some common entry points for house spiders include open windows, chimneys, and gaps beneath doors.
  • House spiders’ flexible bodies allow them to squeeze through very small spaces.
  • Unintentional transportation of house spider eggs or young spiders can occur when items are brought inside from outside.

Note: House spiders can be quite adaptable in finding their way inside homes and controlling their entry can present a challenge.

Tegenaria Parietina Has A Leg Span Of 120Mm

Tegenaria parietina, also known as the Giant House Spider, lives up to its name with a leg span that can reach a maximum size of 120mm. Encountering this arachnid can be fear-inducing for individuals due to its sheer size. However, it’s important to note that this species is just one of the 11 common house spider species found around homes, each with its own distinctive characteristics and behaviors.

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House spiders, specifically those belonging to the Tegenaria species, are a diverse group of arachnids that frequently enter human dwellings. With their impressive size, including a maximum leg span of 120mm, these spiders can be quite alarming to some. Their presence is often noticed during the autumn months when males actively search for mates, surprising homeowners with their sudden appearances.

House spiders access homes through various routes, taking advantage of open windows, chimneys, and small gaps. While Tegenaria parietina stands out as the largest species, measuring up to 120mm, it’s crucial to remember that the term “house spider” encompasses a range of species commonly found around human dwellings.


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Frequently Asked Questions

What kills spiders?

White vinegar is a natural and effective remedy for eliminating spiders. By combining equal parts of white vinegar and water in a spray bottle, spiders can be easily eradicated upon contact. The acid in the vinegar is highly effective in terminating these unwanted arachnids, making it a safe and accessible solution for spider control in households.

1. How do house spiders adapt to indoor environments and what factors contribute to their presence in homes?

House spiders have adapted to indoor environments by taking advantage of the abundance of food sources, such as other household insects. They have also adapted to the temperature and humidity conditions found in homes, allowing them to survive and reproduce. House spiders are small and often remain hidden in corners, crevices, and behind furniture, which offers them protection from predators and humans. Their ability to produce silk and construct webs enables them to catch prey and create a safe environment for themselves.

Several factors contribute to the presence of house spiders in homes. Firstly, the structures and architecture of buildings provide suitable habitats for them, with many hiding spots and crevices to exploit. Secondly, the use of artificial lighting in homes attracts insects, which in turn serve as a food source for spiders. Additionally, the presence of clutter and undisturbed areas, such as basements and attics, create ideal conditions for house spiders to establish their webs and live undisturbed. Lastly, the lack of natural predators indoors and the absence of extreme weather conditions further support their survival and presence within homes.

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2. What are the distinguishing features of a house spider compared to other types of spiders, and how can one identify a house spider?

House spiders, also known as Tegenaria domestica, have some distinguishing features that set them apart from other types of spiders. They are typically brown or gray in color, with a body length ranging from 7 to 12 millimeters for males and 9 to 18 millimeters for females. House spiders have long, thin legs that are covered in fine hairs. One of their distinctive features is their web, which is funnel-shaped and often found in corners or crevices of a house.

To identify a house spider, one can look for their characteristic appearance and behavior. Their coloration and body shape can be helpful in distinguishing them from other spiders. In addition, the presence of a funnel-shaped web, usually in a dark and quiet area of a home, is a strong indicator of a house spider. Observing their behavior of hiding in the web’s funnel and rushing out to catch prey can also help in identification.

3. What is the typical behavior and lifestyle of a house spider, including its hunting techniques, web-building habits, and reproduction cycle?

House spiders are typically nocturnal creatures that hide in dark corners during the day and emerge at night to hunt for prey. They are adept hunters that rely on their keen sense of touch and vibration to locate their prey, such as flies and other small insects. Unlike some other spider species, house spiders do not use venom to immobilize their prey, but instead they overpower them with their speed and agility.

In terms of web-building habits, house spiders are known for their messy webs, which they construct to serve as their homes and trapping mechanisms. These webs are often found in the corners of rooms, behind furniture, or in other undisturbed areas. House spiders do not exhibit the elaborate web-building structures seen in some other spider species.

Reproduction for house spiders typically involves a courtship ritual, where the males perform a series of visual and vibrational displays to attract females. Following successful mating, female spiders lay eggs inside a sac, which they protect until they hatch. The spiderlings then go through multiple molts as they grow, eventually leaving the sac to become independent spiders.

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